Culturenotes

Random Cultural Notes About Trimaris

These are various ideas and bits of information that aren’t really organized in any coherent fashion.

Most anchors on Imperial seafaring ships are either stone or cast metal shaped in the images of dwarves. The humans think this is funny and clever. Dwarves find this highly offensive.

Elves are divided into 4 main groups. The High Elves are distant, aloof and masters of magic. The Wood Elves are distant, capricious and masters of the woods of Bretagne. The Dark Elves are distant (but not distant enough), merciless and masters of raiding. The Kraken Elves are too close, greedy and masters of the seas. (They’re starting to lose this sea power advantage though.) What no one really knows is that the Kraken Elves are just a front for the High Elves.

The Great Plagues aren’t just diseases. They are a combination of horrible magical events along with diseases, including storms of blood, massive undead uprisings, fearsome mutations and any number of truly awful things. Regular disease outbreaks don’t phase the residents of Trimaris much.

The 3 seas of Trimaris are (in order from western most to eastern most) the Primia, the Middlemere and the Hochzee. The fourth sea, separated by a dangerous narrows is called only the Forgotten Sea.

The Forgotten Sea is usually the first target of Dark Elf raiders on the way into Trimaris. Only the hardiest people, the most desperate, or the ones with something to hide are willing to live there. (This is improving in recent times though.)

Dark Elves are masters of aerial raiding. They fly in magic dirigibles, shaped as large, black drakes known as Dragon Ships. They are raiding ships only though. They use a combination of technology, magic, and volcanic gasses to keep the ships aloft, but they have limited duration. They can cover great distances quickly, but they can’t stay in the field for long. This reinforces the Dark Elf tendency to raid, get their booty and slaves and head for their homelands again.

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